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Disrupting the light/dark cycles of pregnant mice, researchers observe detrimental effects in the mouths of the animals’ pups.

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image: The Badger-Cow TB Connection

The Badger-Cow TB Connection

By | August 5, 2016

Researchers in the U.K. report that badgers may be passing tuberculosis to farm animals not through direct contact, as was previously suspected, but through exposure to urine and feces.

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image: Wolf Species Are Part Coyote

Wolf Species Are Part Coyote

By | July 28, 2016

Genomic analysis reveals wolves and coyotes have hybridized, potentially complicating wolves' protection under the US Endangered Species Act.

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image: Plastic Pollutants Can Harm Fish

Plastic Pollutants Can Harm Fish

By | June 6, 2016

European perch larvae exposed to environmentally relevant concentrations of polystyrene particles preferred to eat the microplastics in place of prey, according to a study.

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | June 1, 2016

14-day-old embryos, prioritizing biodiversity, and more

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image: Research at Micro- and Nanoscales

Research at Micro- and Nanoscales

By | June 1, 2016

From whole cells to genes, closer examination continues to surprise.  

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image: Editing Genomes to Record Cellular Histories

Editing Genomes to Record Cellular Histories

By | May 26, 2016

Researchers harness the power of genome editing to track cell lineages throughout zebrafish development.

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image: Embryo Watch

Embryo Watch

By | May 5, 2016

A new culture system allows researchers to track the development of human embryos in vitro for nearly two weeks.

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image: Cellular Pruning Follows Adult Neurogenesis

Cellular Pruning Follows Adult Neurogenesis

By | May 2, 2016

Newly formed neurons in the adult mouse brain oversprout and get cut back.

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image: Eye on the Tiger

Eye on the Tiger

By | April 13, 2016

Following a century of decline, the global population of wild tigers grows.

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