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image: Eye on the Tiger

Eye on the Tiger

By | April 13, 2016

Following a century of decline, the global population of wild tigers grows.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Serengeti Rules</em>

Book Excerpt from The Serengeti Rules

By | April 1, 2016

In the introduction to the book, author Sean B. Carroll draws the parallels between ecological and physiological maladies.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | April 1, 2016

Lab Girl, The Most Perfect Thing, Half-Earth, and Cosmosapiens

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | April 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Parallel Plagues

Parallel Plagues

By | April 1, 2016

Like cancer, ecological scourges result from the breakdown of regulatory processes, and may be treated with similar logic.

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A study suggests bats in Asia could have genes that protect them from the fungal infection that is decimating bat populations in North America.

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image: Migrating Monarch Numbers Rebound

Migrating Monarch Numbers Rebound

By | March 1, 2016

The iconic butterflies have flocked to their Mexican overwintering grounds, seemingly reversing recent population declines.

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image: TS Picks: February 29, 2016

TS Picks: February 29, 2016

By | February 29, 2016

Reintroduced apes facing challenges; Zika conspiracy theories sow confusion; UK researchers nervous about new anti-lobbying law

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | February 1, 2016

What Should a Clever Moose Eat?, The Illusion of God's Presence, GMO Sapiens, and Why We Snap

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image: Keep Off the Grass

Keep Off the Grass

By | February 1, 2016

Ecologists focused on grasslands urge policymakers to keep forestation efforts in check.

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