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» conservation, evolution and ecology

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image: Earliest Modern Europeans Described

Earliest Modern Europeans Described

By | November 3, 2011

A fossilized jaw bone and teeth from Western Europe are recognized as the oldest modern human fossils recovered in the region.

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image: Wildlife Biologist Goes Too Far?

Wildlife Biologist Goes Too Far?

By | November 2, 2011

An avid conservationist is found guilty of attempting to poison feral cats, which she claims are a threat to wild birds.

100 Comments

image: Ladybug Zombies

Ladybug Zombies

By | October 31, 2011

Wasps inject their larvae into ladybug abdomens, where they feast on the bugs’ insides.

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image: Bacterial Rejuvenation

Bacterial Rejuvenation

By | October 27, 2011

Bacteria age, but as a lineage, can live forever.

6 Comments

image: Deadly Bat Fungus Nailed Down

Deadly Bat Fungus Nailed Down

By | October 26, 2011

Scientists have made a definitive link between a recently-discovered fungus and a lethal disease wiping out bat populations in eastern North America.

12 Comments

image: Rhino Goes Extinct in Vietnam

Rhino Goes Extinct in Vietnam

By | October 26, 2011

The last rhinoceros left in Vietnam was found killed, its horn sawed off, most likely by poachers.

6 Comments

image: Orangutans Have Culture

Orangutans Have Culture

By | October 25, 2011

A study shows that different populations of the Southeast Asian ape display and transmit specific behaviors through generations in a way similar to human cultures.

3 Comments

image: Dryer Lint Reaches Oceans

Dryer Lint Reaches Oceans

By | October 24, 2011

Microscopic fibers shed by your clothes in the wash are making their way to the oceans round the world, where they could harm marine organisms.

6 Comments

image: <em>Wolbachia</em> Boost Stem Cell Production

Wolbachia Boost Stem Cell Production

By | October 20, 2011

The widespread bacteria known to manipulate host reproductive output can do so by ramping up stem cell division and consequent egg production in Drosophila.

3 Comments

image: New Genes, New Brain

New Genes, New Brain

By | October 19, 2011

A bevy of genes known to be active during human fetal and infant development first appeared at the same time that the prefrontal cortex—the area of the brain associated with human intelligence and personality—took shape in primates.

12 Comments

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