The Scientist

» conservation

Most Recent

image: A Century of Science on Stamps

A Century of Science on Stamps

By | January 1, 2016

Countries have used postage stamps to commemorate scientific achievements—sometimes with erroneous zeal—since the early 1900s.

0 Comments

image: A Rainforest Chorus

A Rainforest Chorus

By | December 1, 2015

Researchers measure the health of Papua New Guinea’s forests by analyzing the ecological soundscape.

0 Comments

image: Jungle Field Trip

Jungle Field Trip

By | December 1, 2015

Travel to remote rain forests in Papua New Guinea with researchers from The Nature Conservancy who are working with native people to characterize ecosystems there using sound.

0 Comments

image: Spiders, Prey Leave DNA

Spiders, Prey Leave DNA

By | November 30, 2015

A study of black widow spiders suggests that the arachnids leave traces of their own genetic material and DNA from prey in their sticky webs.

0 Comments

image: Vultures in Africa Threatened

Vultures in Africa Threatened

By | October 30, 2015

A new assessment highlights an increased extinction risk among some of the continent’s vulture species.

0 Comments

image: One-Third of Cactus Species Threatened

One-Third of Cactus Species Threatened

By | October 6, 2015

A global assessment of declining cacti populations places responsibility on increasing human activities.

0 Comments

image: Butterflies in Peril

Butterflies in Peril

By | August 12, 2015

Several recent studies point to serious—and mysterious—declines in butterfly numbers across the globe.

5 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | March 1, 2015

Evolving Ourselves, The Man Who Touched His Own Heart, Bats, and The Invaders

1 Comment

image: Prominent Marine Biologist Dies

Prominent Marine Biologist Dies

By | February 27, 2015

Eugenie Clark, known to many as “Shark Lady,” has passed away at age 92.

0 Comments

image: Frog Nurseries

Frog Nurseries

By | February 9, 2015

Mimicking the rainforest water holes left by peccaries can help boost frog populations, a study suggests.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Broad Wins CRISPR Patent Interference Case
    Daily News Broad Wins CRISPR Patent Interference Case

    The USPTO’s Patent Trial and Appeal Board has ruled in favor of the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard retaining intellectual property rights covered by its patents for CRISPR gene-editing technology.

  2. Henrietta Lacks’s Family Seeks Compensation
  3. Humans Never Stopped Evolving
    Features Humans Never Stopped Evolving

    The emergence of blood abnormalities, an adult ability to digest milk, and changes in our physical appearance point to the continued evolution of the human race.

  4. Abundant Sequence Errors in Public Databases
Business Birmingham