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image: Playing With Ecology

Playing With Ecology

By | July 12, 2012

A card game based on interacting species aims to get children interested in real plants and animals.

4 Comments

image: Alternative Medicines

Alternative Medicines

By | July 1, 2012

As nonconventional medical treatments become increasingly mainstream, we take a look at the science behind some of the most popular.

62 Comments

image: Flower Barcodes

Flower Barcodes

By | June 28, 2012

Wales creates a database of DNA barcodes for all of its native flowering plants, hoping to guide conservation and drug development efforts.

1 Comment

image: Saving the Vulture

Saving the Vulture

By | June 27, 2012

The California condor is being threatened by lead bullets that it eats in the carcass of hunted animals.

2 Comments

image: Ornithologists Want Windmill Research

Ornithologists Want Windmill Research

By | June 21, 2012

Researchers call for access to more data from energy companies to find strategies that will limit bird and bat deaths from wind turbines.

1 Comment

image: “Extinct” Toad Rediscovered

“Extinct” Toad Rediscovered

By | June 21, 2012

A yellow-bellied dwarf toad, last sighted in 1876, is rediscovered in Sri Lanka.

0 Comments

image: To Advocate or Not?

To Advocate or Not?

By | June 18, 2012

A journal editor is let go because she resisted advocacy statements in the published literature, prompting several board members to quit in her defense.

4 Comments

image: Opinion: The Precarious Earth

Opinion: The Precarious Earth

By | June 18, 2012

People are currently driving the planet on a crash course with global stability. Something must be done.

39 Comments

image: The Ecology of Fear

The Ecology of Fear

By | June 15, 2012

Grasshoppers in fear of predation die with less nitrogen in their bodies than unstressed grasshoppers, which can affect soil ecology.

2 Comments

image: Discovering Phasmids

Discovering Phasmids

By | June 9, 2012

Shortly after a rat infested supply ship ran around in Lord Howe Island off the east coast of Australia in 1918, the newly introduced mammals wiped out the island's phasmids—stick insects the size of a human hand. 

0 Comments

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