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image: Climate Change Threatens Mammals

Climate Change Threatens Mammals

By | May 16, 2012

Almost 10 percent of mammals in the Western Hemisphere won’t be able to shift their territories in time to avoid the consequences of climate change.

9 Comments

image: Can Fish Eco-Labeling be Trusted?

Can Fish Eco-Labeling be Trusted?

By | May 14, 2012

Programs that provide sustainable certification for fisheries may be too generous with their accreditation.

3 Comments

image: It’s Raining Mice

It’s Raining Mice

By | May 1, 2012

A new brown tree snake control strategy takes to the skies as scientists scatter toxic rodents over Guam’s forest canopy.

10 Comments

image: Opinion: Politics Doesn’t Threaten Owl

Opinion: Politics Doesn’t Threaten Owl

By | April 30, 2012

A US Fish and Wildlife official responds to the assertion that the northern spotted owl is being mismanaged by government.

12 Comments

image: Rare Reptiles Breed in Wild

Rare Reptiles Breed in Wild

By | April 27, 2012

Two baby ploughshare tortoises born to parents raised in a captive breeding program are discovered in Madagascar, validating the conservation effort.

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image: Polar Bear More Ancient Than Realized

Polar Bear More Ancient Than Realized

By | April 20, 2012

A genetic analysis reveals that the polar bear split from the brown bear some 600,000 years ago.

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image: Spotted: Emperor Penguins

Spotted: Emperor Penguins

By | April 17, 2012

Satellites are used to count the number of penguins living in Antarctica.

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image: Spotting a Giraffe's Age

Spotting a Giraffe's Age

By | April 11, 2012

A giraffe’s spots can give away its years.

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image: Telltale Tortoises

Telltale Tortoises

By | April 1, 2012

Researchers are permanently marking endangered reptiles in Madagascar to keep the animals from entering the illegal wildlife trade. Read the full story. [gallery]

4 Comments

image: Marked for Life

Marked for Life

By | April 1, 2012

Conservationists working in Madagascar are doing the unthinkable—defacing the shells of endangered ploughshare tortoises—but it may be the animals’ last hope.

4 Comments

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