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A chloroplast mutation has dramatically affected the genomes of railside populations of Arabidopsis thaliana.

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image: Understanding Human Accelerated Regions

Understanding Human Accelerated Regions

By | August 1, 2016

Fast-evolving regions of the human genome differentiate our species from all other mammals.

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image: Decoding Human Accelerated Regions

Decoding Human Accelerated Regions

By | August 1, 2016

Do the portions of our genomes that set us apart from other animals hold the secret to human evolution?

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image: Humans Never Stopped Evolving

Humans Never Stopped Evolving

By | August 1, 2016

The emergence of blood abnormalities, an adult ability to digest milk, and changes in our physical appearance point to the continued evolution of the human race.

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High school and college-level oral examiners graded women higher than men in male-dominated fields.

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image: Man and Bird Chat While Honey Hunting

Man and Bird Chat While Honey Hunting

By | July 25, 2016

A study suggests that humans and avians in sub-Saharan Africa communicate to find and mutually benefit from the sweet booty.

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image: Primates, Gut Microbes Evolved Together

Primates, Gut Microbes Evolved Together

By | July 21, 2016

Symbiotic gut bacteria evolved and diverged along with ape and human lineages, researchers find. 

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image: Another Dinosaur with Short Arms Discovered

Another Dinosaur with Short Arms Discovered

By | July 14, 2016

Gualicho shinyae evolved small limbs independently of T. rex, researchers report.

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image: Male Docs in Academia Earn More: Study

Male Docs in Academia Earn More: Study

By | July 12, 2016

Female physicians working at medical schools in the U.S. make about $51,000 less than their male counterparts on average.

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image: Hot Off the Presses

Hot Off the Presses

By | July 1, 2016

The Scientist reviews Serendipity, Complexity, The Human Superorgasism, and Love and Ruin

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