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image: Protein or Perish

Protein or Perish

By | September 1, 2016

A bacteriophage must evolve certain variants of a protein or die.

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image: CRISPR Antidotes Galore

CRISPR Antidotes Galore

By | June 13, 2016

Anti-CRISPR proteins are prevalent in phage genomes and bacterial mobile genetic elements, researchers show.

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image: Lu on Syn Bio

Lu on Syn Bio

By | May 1, 2016

MIT researcher and Scientist to Watch Timothy Lu talks about the value of cross-disciplinary approaches in bringing synthetic biology into the clinic.

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image: Timothy Lu: Niche Perfect

Timothy Lu: Niche Perfect

By | May 1, 2016

Associate Professor, Departments of Electrical Engineering & Computer Science and Biological Engineering, MIT. Age: 35

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image: Viral Soldiers

Viral Soldiers

By | January 1, 2016

Phage therapy to combat bacterial infections is garnering attention for the second time in 100 years, but solid clinical support for its widespread use is still lacking.

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image: There’s CRISPR in Your Yogurt

There’s CRISPR in Your Yogurt

By | January 1, 2015

We’ve all been eating food enhanced by the genome-editing tool for years.

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image: Abundant, Widespread Virus Discovered

Abundant, Widespread Virus Discovered

By | July 29, 2014

Scientists identify a bacteriophage that is highly abundant in the gut bacteria of people around the world.

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image: Going Viral

Going Viral

By | September 1, 2013

Bacteriophages shuttle genes between diverse ecosystems.

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image: Going Viral

Going Viral

By | September 1, 2013

From therapeutics to gene transfer, bacteriophages offer a sustainable and powerful method of controlling microbes.

6 Comments

image: The Making of a Trait

The Making of a Trait

By | January 26, 2012

Populations of organisms acquire beneficial traits repeatedly and rapidly through co-evolution with other species and through gene interaction.

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