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The Scientist

» white nose syndrome (WNS)

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image: Bats Make a Comeback

Bats Make a Comeback

By | December 22, 2014

Citizen-scientist data obtained through the U.K.’s National Bat Monitoring Programme show that populations of 10 bat species have stabilized or are growing.

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image: Bad Raps

Bad Raps

By | December 1, 2014

Understanding animal diseases—for their sake and for ours

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image: TS Live: Disease on the Wing

TS Live: Disease on the Wing

By | December 1, 2014

Bats' special relationship with pathogens

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image: A Race Against Extinction

A Race Against Extinction

By | December 1, 2014

Bat populations ravaged; hundreds of amphibian species driven to extinction; diverse groups of birds threatened. Taking risks will be necessary to control deadly wildlife pathogens.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | December 1, 2014

Meet some of the people featured in the December 2014 issue of The Scientist.

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image: <em>The Scientist</em> on The Pulse, May 9

The Scientist on The Pulse, May 9

By | May 9, 2014

The rejuvenating effects of young blood, white nose syndrome spread, and penguin flu

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image: Bat-Killing Fungus Spreads West

Bat-Killing Fungus Spreads West

By | August 5, 2013

Researchers have detected the fungus responsible for white-nose syndrome, which decimates bat populations, in Arkansas.

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image: Bunker Bats

Bunker Bats

By | August 1, 2013

Military bunkers along the US East Coast may serve as sterile overwintering sites for bat populations threatened by white-nose syndrome.

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image: Hunker Bunker

Hunker Bunker

By | August 1, 2013

Inside the Cold War bunker where wildlife biologists tried to create a safe haven for bats at risk of contracting a deadly fungal disease

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image: A Cloud for Bats

A Cloud for Bats

By | August 2, 2012

A unique habitat seeks to bring awareness to a disease decimating populations of the flying mammals.

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