The Scientist

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image: Getting the Word Out

Getting the Word Out

By | February 1, 2016

In a shifting media landscape with a growing public interest in science, some researchers are doing their own PR.

2 Comments

image: Scientific Literacy Redefined

Scientific Literacy Redefined

By | February 1, 2016

Researchers could become better at engaging in public discourse by more fully considering the social and cultural contexts of their work.

9 Comments

image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | February 1, 2016

February 2016's selection of notable quotes

1 Comment

image: The Fungi Within

The Fungi Within

By | February 1, 2016

Diverse fungal species live in and on the human body.

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image: The Mycobiome

The Mycobiome

By | February 1, 2016

The largely overlooked resident fungal community plays a critical role in human health and disease.

10 Comments

image: Counting Cells

Counting Cells

By | January 11, 2016

A person likely carries the same number of human and microbial cells, according to a new estimate.

1 Comment

image: A Century of Science on Stamps

A Century of Science on Stamps

By | January 1, 2016

Countries have used postage stamps to commemorate scientific achievements—sometimes with erroneous zeal—since the early 1900s.

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image: All Together Now

All Together Now

By | January 1, 2016

Understanding the biological roots of cooperation might help resolve some of the biggest scientific challenges we face.

1 Comment

image: Credit for CRISPR: A Conversation with George Church

Credit for CRISPR: A Conversation with George Church

By | December 29, 2015

The media frenzy over the gene-editing technique highlights shortcomings in how journalists and award committees portray contributions to scientific discoveries.

9 Comments

image: Researchers Accused of Spreading Disease

Researchers Accused of Spreading Disease

By | December 21, 2015

Italian scientists are under investigation for allegedly worsening the transmission of a pathogen that is decimating olive groves in Puglia.

0 Comments

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