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image: Next Generation: Bactericidal Surface

Next Generation: Bactericidal Surface

By | November 26, 2013

A synthetic material covered in nano-spikes resembling those found on insect wings is an effective killer of diverse microbes.

2 Comments

image: Public View of Science in EU

Public View of Science in EU

By | November 18, 2013

A new public opinion poll shows European Union citizens feel favorably about science and technology, but in the dark about advances in the fields.

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image: Thwarting Persistence

Thwarting Persistence

By | November 13, 2013

Researchers show that activating an endogenous protease can eliminate bacterial persisters.

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image: Microbial Mediators

Microbial Mediators

By | November 11, 2013

Researchers show that symbiotic bacteria can help hyenas communicate with one another.

1 Comment

image: Astrogerm

Astrogerm

By | November 11, 2013

Researchers find a new bacterial species lurking in clean rooms used to assemble spacecraft at NASA and the European Space Agency.

2 Comments

image: Opinion: Who We Work For

Opinion: Who We Work For

By | November 5, 2013

On winning hearts, minds, and votes for science

1 Comment

image: Week in Review: October 21–25

Week in Review: October 21–25

By | October 25, 2013

PubMed launches Commons; measuring HIV’s latent reservoir; immune-related pathway variation in genome, microbiome; rapamycin and flu vaccines; grasshopper mice resistant to pain

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image: It’s in the Genes

It’s in the Genes

By | October 24, 2013

Researchers find strong correlations between the composition of the human microbiome and genetic variation in immune-related pathways.

4 Comments

image: Post-Publication Peer Review Mainstreamed

Post-Publication Peer Review Mainstreamed

By | October 22, 2013

The launch of PubMed Commons highlights the pros and cons of re-reviewing published papers. 

6 Comments

image: Secret Botulism Paper Published

Secret Botulism Paper Published

By | October 18, 2013

The discovery of a new form of the deadly botulinum toxin gets published, but its sequence is kept under wraps until an antidote is developed.

0 Comments

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