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image: Q&A: Marching for Science in Cleveland

Q&A: Marching for Science in Cleveland

By | February 2, 2017

A conversation with evolutionary biologist Patricia Princehouse

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image: Q&A: Marching for Science in Eugene

Q&A: Marching for Science in Eugene

By | February 2, 2017

A conversation with writer and geologist Ruby McConnell 

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image: Q&A: Marching for Science in Buffalo

Q&A: Marching for Science in Buffalo

By | February 1, 2017

A conversation with pharmacology PhD student Alexandria Trujillo and undergraduate research assistant Jonathan Plaza

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image: Q&A: Marching for Science in Atlanta

Q&A: Marching for Science in Atlanta

By | January 30, 2017

A conversation with Atlanta Science Tavern Executive Director Marc Merlin

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image: Unique Antibodies Open Path Toward New HIV Vaccines

Unique Antibodies Open Path Toward New HIV Vaccines

By | January 27, 2017

A family of broadly neutralizing antibodies from a chronically infected donor provides a schematic for designing vaccines and treatments that target multiple strains of the virus.

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image: Journals Seek Out Preprints

Journals Seek Out Preprints

By | January 18, 2017

With its recruitment of dedicated “preprint editors,” PLOS Genetics makes official the practice of soliciting non-peer–reviewed manuscripts posted online. 

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image: Mouse Immunology Paper Retracted

Mouse Immunology Paper Retracted

By | December 16, 2016

A finding of misconduct spurs the retraction of a Science paper claiming to have identified a protein in mice that boosted immunity to both viruses and cancer.

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image: Naive T Cells Find Homes in Lymphoid Tissue

Naive T Cells Find Homes in Lymphoid Tissue

By | December 2, 2016

The human lymph nodes and spleen maintain unique, compartmentalized sets of naive T cells well into old age.

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Four years ago, chemist Nate Allen helped turn an unruly message board into an open platform for in-depth conversations about science. 

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image: Low Social Status May Weaken Immune System in Monkeys

Low Social Status May Weaken Immune System in Monkeys

By | November 29, 2016

Life at the bottom of the pecking order ramps up inflammation, according to new research, an effect that appears to be reversible.

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