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image: Newest Life Science Additions to the Dictionary

Newest Life Science Additions to the Dictionary

By | February 8, 2017

Need help explaining CRISPR, epigenome, or rock snot? The Merriam-Webster dictionary has you covered.

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image: Q&A: Marching for Science in Lansing

Q&A: Marching for Science in Lansing

By | February 8, 2017

A conversation with research analyst Sierra Owen and retired paramedic firefighter Sara Pack

4 Comments

image: How Plants Evolved to Eat Meat

How Plants Evolved to Eat Meat

By | February 7, 2017

Pitcher plants across different continents acquired their tastes for meat in similar ways.

1 Comment

image: Opinion: Should Scientists Engage in Activism?

Opinion: Should Scientists Engage in Activism?

By | February 7, 2017

Scientists who accept funding with the tacit agreement that they keep their mouths shut about the government are far more threatening to an independent academy than those who speak their minds.

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image: Q&A: Marching for Science in Anchorage

Q&A: Marching for Science in Anchorage

By | February 6, 2017

A conversation with ecologist Bryan Box

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image: Q&A: Marching for Science in Cleveland

Q&A: Marching for Science in Cleveland

By | February 2, 2017

A conversation with evolutionary biologist Patricia Princehouse

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image: Q&A: Marching for Science in Eugene

Q&A: Marching for Science in Eugene

By | February 2, 2017

A conversation with writer and geologist Ruby McConnell 

1 Comment

image: Q&A: Marching for Science in Buffalo

Q&A: Marching for Science in Buffalo

By | February 1, 2017

A conversation with pharmacology PhD student Alexandria Trujillo and undergraduate research assistant Jonathan Plaza

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image: Cannibalism: Not That Weird

Cannibalism: Not That Weird

By | February 1, 2017

Eating members of your own species might turn the stomach of the average human, but some animal species make a habit of dining on their own.

4 Comments

image: Earliest Deuterostome Fossils Described

Earliest Deuterostome Fossils Described

By | January 31, 2017

These millimeter-size sea creatures lived 540 million years ago.

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