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Attorneys representing pathologist Fazlul Sarkar and users of the post-publication peer review website present their cases regarding the constitutionality of subpoenaing for the identities of anonymous commenters.

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image: TS Picks: September 19, 2016

TS Picks: September 19, 2016

By | September 19, 2016

Human-Neanderthal inbreeding; “personal genetics” is a family matter; studying city-dwelling rats; science reporting without embargoes

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image: Q&A: Why I Warned AAAS About the Hack

Q&A: Why I Warned AAAS About the Hack

By | September 14, 2016

Philipp Hummel, the journalist who alerted EurekAlert administrators to a security breach, discusses the role of embargoes in science reporting.

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image: AAAS Press Release Repository Hacked

AAAS Press Release Repository Hacked

By | September 14, 2016

EurekAlert is offline after a journalist alerts the American Association for the Advancement of Science to a security breach.

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image: Helping Scientists Spread Their Research

Helping Scientists Spread Their Research

By | August 1, 2016

A platform called Kudos helps users disseminate—and explain—their publications for free.

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image: Five Days, Five Science Plays

Five Days, Five Science Plays

By | July 1, 2016

Seattle-based science writers and playwrights collaborated to produce theatrical works in a week.

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image: Getting the Word Out

Getting the Word Out

By | February 1, 2016

In a shifting media landscape with a growing public interest in science, some researchers are doing their own PR.

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image: Scientific Literacy Redefined

Scientific Literacy Redefined

By | February 1, 2016

Researchers could become better at engaging in public discourse by more fully considering the social and cultural contexts of their work.

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image: A Century of Science on Stamps

A Century of Science on Stamps

By | January 1, 2016

Countries have used postage stamps to commemorate scientific achievements—sometimes with erroneous zeal—since the early 1900s.

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image: Credit for CRISPR: A Conversation with George Church

Credit for CRISPR: A Conversation with George Church

By | December 29, 2015

The media frenzy over the gene-editing technique highlights shortcomings in how journalists and award committees portray contributions to scientific discoveries.

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