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image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | October 17, 2011

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

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image: Beyond Nature vs. Nurture

Beyond Nature vs. Nurture

By | October 1, 2011

Researchers studying differences in how individuals respond to stress are finding that genes are malleable and environments can be deterministic.

12 Comments

image: Book Excerpt from <em>Future Science: Essays From the Cutting Edge</em>

Book Excerpt from Future Science: Essays From the Cutting Edge

By | October 1, 2011

In an essay entitled "Nurture, Nature, and the Stress That is Life," neurobiologists Darlene Francis and Daniela Kaufer envision a future where science moves past the nature vs. nurture debate in considering differences in human behavioral responses to stress.

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image: Amoebae Get Organized

Amoebae Get Organized

By | September 1, 2011

Editor’s Choice in Developmental Biology

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image: Velcro Helps Muscles Grow

Velcro Helps Muscles Grow

By | August 31, 2011

Stretching muscle cells as they grow helps promote the expression of growth factors.

9 Comments

image: Next Generation: Hundreds of Cell-Analyses at Once

Next Generation: Hundreds of Cell-Analyses at Once

By | August 11, 2011

A new microfluidics chip lets researchers analyze the nucleic acids of 300 individual cells simultaneously.

3 Comments

image: Lab-Grown Sperm

Lab-Grown Sperm

By | August 4, 2011

Healthy mice are born from germ cell precursors grown in vitro.

6 Comments

image: How Vampire Bats Find Veins

How Vampire Bats Find Veins

By | August 4, 2011

Heat-sensing protein channels in vampire bats allow the flying mammals to find the best place to sink their teeth into their prey.

12 Comments

image: Deconstructing the Mosaic Brain

Deconstructing the Mosaic Brain

By | August 1, 2011

Sequencing the DNA of individual neurons is a way to dissect the genes underlying major neurological and psychological disorders.

6 Comments

image: Circadian Signs of Aging

Circadian Signs of Aging

By | July 13, 2011

The neural nexus of the circadian clock shows signs of functional decline as mice age, providing clues as to why sleep patterns tend to change as people grow older.

27 Comments

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