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image: New Drug Target for Three Tropical Diseases

New Drug Target for Three Tropical Diseases

By | August 9, 2016

Researchers efficiently clear mice of the parasites that cause leishmaniasis, Chagas disease, and sleeping sickness by inhibiting the parasites’ kinetoplastid proteasomes.

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image: Study: Melioidosis Underreported

Study: Melioidosis Underreported

By | January 12, 2016

Researchers warn that a poorly understood, life-threatening tropical disease may be killing thousands more people than previously realized.

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image: Opinion: Diagnostics for NTDs

Opinion: Diagnostics for NTDs

By | August 25, 2014

Developing treatments for neglected tropical diseases is only half the battle.

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image: Are <em>Leishmania</em> Protecting their Sand Fly Hosts?

Are Leishmania Protecting their Sand Fly Hosts?

By | July 23, 2014

The microbial contents of sand fly stomachs may have important consequences for the spread of leishmaniasis.

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image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By | April 24, 2014

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes

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image: Deep Doo-doo

Deep Doo-doo

By | January 4, 2013

An open-access study explores the intricacies of parasite egg distribution and viability in human feces.

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image: $785 Million for Tropical Diseases

$785 Million for Tropical Diseases

By | January 31, 2012

A public-private partnership including 13 pharmaceutical companies pledge more than $785 million to fight neglected tropical diseases.

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