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The Scientist

» US Fish & Wildlife Service

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image: Bat-Killing Fungus Spreads West

Bat-Killing Fungus Spreads West

By | August 5, 2013

Researchers have detected the fungus responsible for white-nose syndrome, which decimates bat populations, in Arkansas.

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image: Killer Kittens

Killer Kittens

By | January 31, 2013

Domestic cats kill billions of birds and mammals every year, making them a top threat to US wildlife.

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image: Opinion: Politics Doesn’t Threaten Owl

Opinion: Politics Doesn’t Threaten Owl

By | April 30, 2012

A US Fish and Wildlife official responds to the assertion that the northern spotted owl is being mismanaged by government.

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image: Bat Deaths Hit 6 Million

Bat Deaths Hit 6 Million

By | January 19, 2012

The deadly white-nose fungus has killed some 6 million bats in the 5 years since its discovery—and it doesn’t show sign of stopping.

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image: National plan save bats

National plan save bats

By | May 19, 2011

In light of the looming threat of extinction of North American bat populations brought on by the lethal and rapidly spreading disease known as white nose syndrome, the US Fish and Wildlife Service unveiled this week a national plan for coordinating efforts for combatting the disease at the loca, state, and federal level.

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