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image: New Drug Target for Three Tropical Diseases

New Drug Target for Three Tropical Diseases

By | August 9, 2016

Researchers efficiently clear mice of the parasites that cause leishmaniasis, Chagas disease, and sleeping sickness by inhibiting the parasites’ kinetoplastid proteasomes.

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image: Gut Bacteria for Insect RNAi

Gut Bacteria for Insect RNAi

By | June 1, 2016

Lacing insect food with microbes encoding double-stranded RNAs can suppress insect gene expression.

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image: Chagas Watchdogs

Chagas Watchdogs

By | September 1, 2014

Can screening dogs for Trypanosoma cruzi antibodies inform public health officials about the risk of Chagas disease to people?

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image: Six-Legged Syringes

Six-Legged Syringes

By | September 1, 2014

Researchers whose work requires that they draw blood from wild animals are finding unlikely collaborators in biting insects.

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image: This Bug Sucks

This Bug Sucks

By | September 1, 2014

An assassin bug, which some researchers are using as living syringes to sample blood from birds and mammals, feeds on a bat.

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image: Biology's Coefficient

Biology's Coefficient

By | December 1, 2013

Joel Cohen uses the tools of mathematics to deconstruct questions of life.

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image: $785 Million for Tropical Diseases

$785 Million for Tropical Diseases

By | January 31, 2012

A public-private partnership including 13 pharmaceutical companies pledge more than $785 million to fight neglected tropical diseases.

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