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image: Week in Review: May 12–16

Week in Review: May 12–16

By | May 16, 2014

Antidepressant could prevent Alzheimer’s plaques; 12,000-year-old human skeleton sequenced; disentangling the mystery of octopus arms; taking a look at the ocular microbiome

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image: Hear Ye, Hear Ye

Hear Ye, Hear Ye

By | May 1, 2014

Tools for tracking quorum-sensing signals in bacterial colonies

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image: The Telltale Tail

The Telltale Tail

By | May 1, 2014

A symbiotic relationship between squid and bacteria provides an alternative explanation for bacterial sheathed flagella.

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image: Neuroaesthetics

Neuroaesthetics

By | May 1, 2014

Researchers unravel the biology of beauty and art.

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image: Microbe’s Diversity Is Vast, Ancient

Microbe’s Diversity Is Vast, Ancient

By | April 24, 2014

A marine cyanobacterium possesses astounding genomic diversity, yet still organizes into distinct subpopulations that have likely persisted for ages.

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image: Money Microbiome

Money Microbiome

By | April 24, 2014

Swabbing cash circulating in New York City reveals more than 3,000 different types of bacteria.

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image: Microbiome Influences

Microbiome Influences

By | April 22, 2014

Researchers find that gender, education level, and breastfeeding can affect humans’ commensal microbial communities.

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image: Dermatologically Derived

Dermatologically Derived

By | April 1, 2014

Inspired by turkey skin, researchers devise a bacteriophage-based sensor whose color changes upon binding specific molecules.

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image: Metals on our Mind

Metals on our Mind

By | April 1, 2014

A dramatic loss of copper in key brain regions may be central to Alzheimer’s disease. Could restoring metals in the brain help?

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image: Cysteine Aids Mice with Huntington’s

Cysteine Aids Mice with Huntington’s

By | March 31, 2014

Rodent models of Huntington’s disease show dysfunctional cysteine production, and adding the amino acid to their diets seems to relieve symptoms.  

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