The Scientist

» neurodegeneration and microbiology

Most Recent

image: Circadian Clock and Aging

Circadian Clock and Aging

By | February 3, 2016

Whether a critical circadian clock gene is deleted before or after birth impacts the observed aging-related effects in mice.

0 Comments

image: Contributors

Contributors

By | February 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the February 2016 issue of The Scientist.

0 Comments

image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | February 1, 2016

February 2016's selection of notable quotes

1 Comment

image: The Fungi Within

The Fungi Within

By | February 1, 2016

Diverse fungal species live in and on the human body.

0 Comments

image: The Mycobiome

The Mycobiome

By | February 1, 2016

The largely overlooked resident fungal community plays a critical role in human health and disease.

10 Comments

image: More Evidence of Alzheimer’s Transmission

More Evidence of Alzheimer’s Transmission

By | January 27, 2016

Examining the brains of seven patients who died of the prion disease called Creutzfeldt–Jakob, researchers find signs of Alzheimer’s pathology. 

1 Comment

image: How Blasts Affect the Brain

How Blasts Affect the Brain

By | January 13, 2016

Repeated exposure to explosions can damage the cerebellum in combat veterans and mouse models alike.

0 Comments

image: Counting Cells

Counting Cells

By | January 11, 2016

A person likely carries the same number of human and microbial cells, according to a new estimate.

1 Comment

image: All Together Now

All Together Now

By | January 1, 2016

Understanding the biological roots of cooperation might help resolve some of the biggest scientific challenges we face.

1 Comment

image: Researchers Accused of Spreading Disease

Researchers Accused of Spreading Disease

By | December 21, 2015

Italian scientists are under investigation for allegedly worsening the transmission of a pathogen that is decimating olive groves in Puglia.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Opinion: Why I Published in a Predatory Journal
    News & Opinion Opinion: Why I Published in a Predatory Journal

    My “colleagues” and I at the fictitious Arthur Vandelay Urological Research Institute were surprised to find our bogus “uromycitisis” case report swiftly accepted, with only minor revisions requested.

  2. Consilience, Episode 3: Cancer, Obscured
  3. Genetic Analysis Reveals the Evolutionary History of Dogs
  4. Record-Setting Corn Grows 45 Feet Tall
AAAS