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image: Bespoke Stem Cells for Brain Disease

Bespoke Stem Cells for Brain Disease

By | January 15, 2013

Scientists use virus-free gene therapy on patient-derived stem cells to repair spinal muscular atrophy in mice.

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image: Junior Seau Had Brain Trauma

Junior Seau Had Brain Trauma

By | January 10, 2013

An NIH study finds that the former NFL linebacker who committed suicide last May had signs of degenerative brain disease.

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image: Fly Guts Reveal Animal Inventory

Fly Guts Reveal Animal Inventory

By | January 7, 2013

Stomachs of flesh-eating flies carry the DNA of animals in remote rainforests.

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image: Fighting Microbes with Microbes

Fighting Microbes with Microbes

By | January 1, 2013

Doctors turn to good microbes to fight disease. Will the same strategy work with crops?

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image: Limber LIMS

Limber LIMS

By | January 1, 2013

Using laboratory information management systems (LIMS) to automate and streamline laboratory tasks: three case studies

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image: 2012 Multimedia Roundup

2012 Multimedia Roundup

By | December 14, 2012

The science images and videos that captured our attention in 2012

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image: Old Ocean Mold

Old Ocean Mold

By | December 12, 2012

Fungi in 100 million year-old seafloor sediments could possess novel antibiotics.

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image: Marlboro Chicks

Marlboro Chicks

By | December 5, 2012

Two species of songbirds pack their nests with scavenged cigarette butts that repel irksome parasites.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | December 1, 2012

Meet some of the people featured in the December 2012 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Coughing Seashells

Coughing Seashells

By | November 28, 2012

A type of scallop expels water and waste through a sort of cough that could reveal clues about water quality.

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