The Scientist

» neurodegeneration and ecology

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | February 1, 2016

What Should a Clever Moose Eat?, The Illusion of God's Presence, GMO Sapiens, and Why We Snap

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image: Keep Off the Grass

Keep Off the Grass

By | February 1, 2016

Ecologists focused on grasslands urge policymakers to keep forestation efforts in check.

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image: Jason Holliday: Tree Tracker

Jason Holliday: Tree Tracker

By | February 1, 2016

Associate Professor, Virginia Tech, Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation. Age: 37

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image: More Evidence of Alzheimer’s Transmission

More Evidence of Alzheimer’s Transmission

By | January 27, 2016

Examining the brains of seven patients who died of the prion disease called Creutzfeldt–Jakob, researchers find signs of Alzheimer’s pathology. 

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image: How Blasts Affect the Brain

How Blasts Affect the Brain

By | January 13, 2016

Repeated exposure to explosions can damage the cerebellum in combat veterans and mouse models alike.

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image: Owl Be Darned

Owl Be Darned

By | December 4, 2015

Researchers studying city-dwelling birds are learning about which animals are more suited to urban life.

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image: A Rainforest Chorus

A Rainforest Chorus

By | December 1, 2015

Researchers measure the health of Papua New Guinea’s forests by analyzing the ecological soundscape.

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image: Jungle Field Trip

Jungle Field Trip

By | December 1, 2015

Travel to remote rain forests in Papua New Guinea with researchers from The Nature Conservancy who are working with native people to characterize ecosystems there using sound.

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image: The Regenerator

The Regenerator

By | December 1, 2015

In his search for effective therapies for Parkinson’s disease, Lorenz Studer is uncovering pluripotency switches and clues to what makes cells age.

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image: Urban Owl-Fitters

Urban Owl-Fitters

By | December 1, 2015

How birds with an innate propensity for living among humans are establishing populations in cities

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