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image: Formaldehyde Fears

Formaldehyde Fears

By | October 1, 2015

Data on the links between ALS and the chemical have been contradictory, but the latest study suggests undertakers are at risk.

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image: Undertaker's Bane

Undertaker's Bane

By | October 1, 2015

Harvard Professor Marc Weisskopf discusses the potential link between formaldehyde and ALS.

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image: Brain Gain

Brain Gain

By | October 1, 2015

Young neurons in the adult human brain are likely critical to its function.

2 Comments

image: Endogenous Retrovirus Active in ALS

Endogenous Retrovirus Active in ALS

By | September 30, 2015

Researchers uncover evidence that a retrovirus embedded within the human genome may play a role in the pathology of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

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image: Butterflies in Peril

Butterflies in Peril

By | August 12, 2015

Several recent studies point to serious—and mysterious—declines in butterfly numbers across the globe.

5 Comments

image: Mimicry Muses

Mimicry Muses

By | August 1, 2015

The animal world is full of clever solutions to bioengineering challenges.

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image: Cognitive Decline More Swift in Women

Cognitive Decline More Swift in Women

By | July 22, 2015

Mental agility in women deteriorates at twice the rate of that in men, according to a study of people with mild cognitive impairment.

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image: 1 + 1 = 1

1 + 1 = 1

By | July 1, 2015

Nutrient levels in soil don’t add up when food chains combine.

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image: Intelligence Gathering

Intelligence Gathering

By | July 1, 2015

Disease eradication in the 21st century

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image: Ravenous Invasive Worm Now in U.S.

Ravenous Invasive Worm Now in U.S.

By | June 25, 2015

Researchers have found the New Guinea flatworm, one of the world’s most invasive species, in Florida, putting native ecosystems at serious risk.

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