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image: Obscured Like an Octopus

Obscured Like an Octopus

By | August 21, 2014

Cephalopod skin inspires engineers to design sheets of adaptive camouflage sensors. 

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image: Methylation Tied to Alzheimer’s

Methylation Tied to Alzheimer’s

By | August 20, 2014

People with the neurodegenerative disease are more likely to have certain epigenetic patterns than those without.

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image: Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

By | August 13, 2014

Hemocytes can form neurons in adult crayfish, a study shows.

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image: Microbes in a Tar Pit

Microbes in a Tar Pit

By | August 8, 2014

Microdroplets of water in a natural asphalt lake are home to active microbial life, a study shows.

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image: How Tinier Theropods Took Flight

How Tinier Theropods Took Flight

By | August 4, 2014

Downsizing dinosaurs was key to the evolution of birds, a study shows. 

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image: Neurodegeneration’s Spread

Neurodegeneration’s Spread

By | August 4, 2014

Researchers show that pathogenic protein aggregates that accumulate within neurons and are a hallmark of Huntington’s disease can propagate from cell to cell.

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image: Cephalopod Coddling

Cephalopod Coddling

By | August 1, 2014

Deep-sea octopus has the longest-known brooding period known for any animal species.

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image: Beyond Cat Killing

Beyond Cat Killing

By | August 1, 2014

Capsule reviewed author Ian Leslie sets up his latest book, Curious, about the human propensity to wonder and learn.

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image: Connecting the Dots

Connecting the Dots

By | August 1, 2014

Extending her initial studies of social wasps, Mary Jane West-Eberhard has spent her career probing the evolutionary relationship between social behavior and developmental flexibility.

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image: Seeds of Hopelessness

Seeds of Hopelessness

By | August 1, 2014

Can seed banks adequately prepare for the future if wild plant populations are already lagging behind in adapting to rapid climate change?

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