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image: Tuning the Brain

Tuning the Brain

By | October 28, 2013

Deep-brain stimulation is allowing neurosurgeons to adjust the neural activity in specific brain regions to treat thousands of patients with myriad neurological disorders.

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image: Sniffing out Alzheimer’s

Sniffing out Alzheimer’s

By | October 9, 2013

A peanut-butter smell test could help diagnose the neurodegenerative disease in its early stages.

1 Comment

image: Autophagy’s Role in Alzheimer’s

Autophagy’s Role in Alzheimer’s

By | October 3, 2013

Researchers show that amyloid beta is secreted from neurons in an autophagy-dependent manner.

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image: Smell and the Degenerating Brain

Smell and the Degenerating Brain

By | October 1, 2013

An impaired sense of smell is one of the earliest symptoms of Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and some other neurodegenerative diseases. Could it be a useful diagnostic tool?

7 Comments

image: Week in Review: September 16–20

Week in Review: September 16–20

By | September 20, 2013

Dealing with anonymous misconduct allegations; efficiently generating iPSCs; distinguishing viral infections from non-viral; imaging tau in vivo

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image: NFL Settles Concussion Case

NFL Settles Concussion Case

By | August 29, 2013

The National Football League will pay a total of $765 million to help cover the medical expenses of more than 4,500 former players and to fund research on head injuries.

2 Comments

image: A Blood Test for Alzheimer’s?

A Blood Test for Alzheimer’s?

By | July 30, 2013

Circulating microRNAs could help doctors diagnose the neurodegenerative disease.

1 Comment

image: Opinion: Toxicants and the Brain

Opinion: Toxicants and the Brain

By | June 17, 2013

Investment in brain research should aim at protecting the brains of the future from harmful environmental pollutants.

1 Comment

image: Brain Activity Breaks DNA

Brain Activity Breaks DNA

By | March 24, 2013

Researchers find that temporary double-stranded DNA breaks commonly result from normal neuron activation—but expression of an Alzheimer’s-linked protein increases the damage.

5 Comments

image: Non-coding Repeats Cause Peptide Clumps

Non-coding Repeats Cause Peptide Clumps

By | February 7, 2013

Protein aggregates in the brains of some people with dementia or motor neuron disease have a surprising origin.

0 Comments

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