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image: Mouse Immunology Paper Retracted

Mouse Immunology Paper Retracted

By | December 16, 2016

A finding of misconduct spurs the retraction of a Science paper claiming to have identified a protein in mice that boosted immunity to both viruses and cancer.

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Scientists present evidence of bacteria-driven mating in flagellate eukaryotes at the American Society for Cell Biology annual meeting.

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image: Phages Carry Antibiotic Resistance Genes

Phages Carry Antibiotic Resistance Genes

By | December 8, 2016

Researchers find evidence of antibiotic resistance genes in the DNA of viruses that infect bacteria.

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image: Naive T Cells Find Homes in Lymphoid Tissue

Naive T Cells Find Homes in Lymphoid Tissue

By | December 2, 2016

The human lymph nodes and spleen maintain unique, compartmentalized sets of naive T cells well into old age.

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image: Gut Microbes Linked to Neurodegenerative Disease

Gut Microbes Linked to Neurodegenerative Disease

By | December 1, 2016

Bacteria in the intestine influence motor dysfunction and neuroinflammation in a mouse model of Parkinson’s disease.

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Scientists are enlisting the help of pigeons, parrots, crows, jays, and other species to disprove the notion that human cognitive abilities are beyond those of other animals.

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image: Slideshow: Nerdy Birdies

Slideshow: Nerdy Birdies

By | December 1, 2016

Meet the pigeons that are redefining what it means to behave like a human by displaying remarkable pattern recognition abilities.

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Different assays lead to opposing conclusions on bacterial spores’ requirements during germination.

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image: Low Social Status May Weaken Immune System in Monkeys

Low Social Status May Weaken Immune System in Monkeys

By | November 29, 2016

Life at the bottom of the pecking order ramps up inflammation, according to new research, an effect that appears to be reversible.

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A new literature review finds that even if babies born via Cesarean section have long-term health risks, as a number of past studies purport, it may not be a result of the procedure itself.

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