The Scientist

» animal behavior, microbiology and evolution

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image: Discovering Novel Antibiotics

Discovering Novel Antibiotics

By | February 1, 2017

Three methods identify and activate silent bacterial gene clusters to uncover new drugs

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image: Earliest Deuterostome Fossils Described

Earliest Deuterostome Fossils Described

By | January 31, 2017

These millimeter-size sea creatures lived 540 million years ago.

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image: Study: One Wasp Takes Control of Another

Study: One Wasp Takes Control of Another

By | January 25, 2017

Crypt keeper wasps appear to command crypt gall wasps to dig exit tunnels on their behalf.

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Study of 81 six-week-olds who were born by C-section or vaginal delivery didn’t show differences in the structure or function of their microbiota, despite contrary results from other studies on babies. 

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Using simulations, scientists report that a mixture of termites and plant competition may be responsible for the strange patterns of earth surrounded by plants in the Namib desert. 

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image: How Traffic Noise Affects Tree Frogs

How Traffic Noise Affects Tree Frogs

By | January 18, 2017

Constant exposure to the sounds of a busy road can impact a male European tree frog’s stress levels, immune system, and vocal sac coloration, scientists show.

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image: Scientists Activate Predatory Instinct in Mice

Scientists Activate Predatory Instinct in Mice

By | January 16, 2017

A new study reveals how the amygdala is involved in controlling predatory behavior in mice.

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image: Baboons Can Make Sounds Found in Human Speech

Baboons Can Make Sounds Found in Human Speech

By | January 13, 2017

The findings suggest language may have started to evolve millions of years earlier than once thought.  

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image: How Plant-Soil Feedback Affects Ecological Diversity

How Plant-Soil Feedback Affects Ecological Diversity

By | January 13, 2017

Researchers examine how underground microbes and nutrients affect plant populations.

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image: How Mammalian Moms and Babies Choose Sides

How Mammalian Moms and Babies Choose Sides

By | January 11, 2017

A survey of 11 species confirms that mothers prefer to keep their offspring to one side of their bodies, but that their offspring tend to approach them from the opposite side.

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