The Scientist

» animal behavior and microbiology

Most Recent

image: Evolution of Kin Discrimination

Evolution of Kin Discrimination

By | July 6, 2015

A bacterium’s ability to distinguish self from non-self can arise spontaneously, a study shows, reigniting questions of whether the trait can be considered an adaptation.

3 Comments

image: Self-fertilizing Worms Stab Their Own Heads

Self-fertilizing Worms Stab Their Own Heads

By | July 1, 2015

The flatworm, Macrostomum hystrix can inject its own sperm into its head, a new study shows.

0 Comments

image: Gutless Worm

Gutless Worm

By | July 1, 2015

Meet the digestive tract–lacking oligochaete that has fueled Max Planck researcher Nicole Dubilier’s interest in symbiosis and marine science.

0 Comments

image: Sold on Symbiosis

Sold on Symbiosis

By | July 1, 2015

A love of the ocean lured Nicole Dubilier into science; gutless sea worms and their nurturing bacterial symbionts keep her at the leading edge of marine microbiology.

0 Comments

image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | July 1, 2015

July 2015's selection of notable quotes

5 Comments

image: Sponging Up Phosphorus

Sponging Up Phosphorus

By | July 1, 2015

Symbiotic bacteria in Caribbean reef sponges store polyphosphate granules, possibly explaining why phosphorous is so scarce in coral reef ecosystems.

1 Comment

image: The Sum of Our Parts

The Sum of Our Parts

By and | July 1, 2015

Putting the microbiome front and center in health care, in preventive strategies, and in health-risk assessments could stem the epidemic of noncommunicable diseases.

14 Comments

image: Week in Review: June 22–26

Week in Review: June 22–26

By | June 26, 2015

Neanderthal-human hybrid discovered; the neurobiology of fear behavior; and an insulin patch that responds to high glucose levels in mice

0 Comments

image: Roos Are Mainly South Paws

Roos Are Mainly South Paws

By | June 22, 2015

A new study shows that kangaroos are predominantly left-handed.

2 Comments

image: Hawkmoth Brains Slow During Dusk Meals

Hawkmoth Brains Slow During Dusk Meals

By | June 15, 2015

This helps the insects collect as much visual information as possible from the gently swaying flowers on which they dine.

1 Comment

Popular Now

  1. Gut Microbes Linked to Neurodegenerative Disease
  2. Infant Microbiome: Vaginal Delivery Versus C-Section
  3. Top 10 Innovations 2016
    Features Top 10 Innovations 2016

    This year’s list of winners celebrates both large leaps and small (but important) steps in life science technology.

  4. Opinion: WHO’s Silence on Cannabis
Rockland