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image: Pheromone for the Young

Pheromone for the Young

By | October 2, 2013

Researchers identify a compound in juvenile mice that inhibits the sexual advances of adult males.

3 Comments

image: Catch My Drift?

Catch My Drift?

By | October 1, 2013

Dogs are proving to be more in tune to human communication than any other animal, but how much they really understand about people’s intentions is up for debate.

6 Comments

image: Animal-tronic

Animal-tronic

By | October 1, 2013

Meet a few robots that pose as flesh-and-blood critters to advance science.

0 Comments

image: Scents in a Flash

Scents in a Flash

By | October 1, 2013

The modern technique of optogenetics stimulates the complex act of smelling with a simple flash of light.

0 Comments

image: Trouble in the Heartland

Trouble in the Heartland

By | October 1, 2013

A new tick-borne disease has emerged in the US Midwest—and the culprit is not a bacterium. 

0 Comments

image: Send in the Bots

Send in the Bots

By | October 1, 2013

Animal robots have become a unique tool for studying the behavior of their flesh-and-blood counterparts.

1 Comment

image: Week in Review: September 23–27

Week in Review: September 23–27

By | September 27, 2013

Antibiotic cycling makes a comeback in the lab; how life scientists can learn from astronauts; napping to conquer fears; deconstructing the cancer R&D crisis

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image: Giving Antibiotic Cycling Another Shot

Giving Antibiotic Cycling Another Shot

By | September 25, 2013

Switching up the drugs used to treat bacterial infections could help clinicians battle both illness and resistance at the same time.

2 Comments

image: The Ultimate Game of Cat and Mouse

The Ultimate Game of Cat and Mouse

By | September 18, 2013

Toxoplasma gondii seems to cause hard-wired changes in the brains of mice that persist even after the parasite is gone.

2 Comments

image: Focus on the Host

Focus on the Host

By | September 18, 2013

A patient response-based gene expression signature can distinguish respiratory infections caused by viruses from those of bacterial or fungal origin.

1 Comment

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