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image: Supergene Explains Ruff Mating

Supergene Explains Ruff Mating

By | November 18, 2015

Two sequencing studies reveal the genetics underlying the sexual behavior of the European and Asian birds.

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image: Blood-Gut Barrier

Blood-Gut Barrier

By | November 12, 2015

Scientists identify a barrier in mice between the intestine and its blood supply, and suggest how Salmonella sneaks through it.

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image: Stressed Shore Crabs

Stressed Shore Crabs

By | November 12, 2015

Electrical shocks cause a physiological stress response in invertebrates previously thought incapable of feeling pain.

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image: Exploring the Inner Universe

Exploring the Inner Universe

By | November 6, 2015

A new American Museum of Natural History exhibit introduces visitors to the microbes within their bodies. 

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | November 1, 2015

The Psychology of Overeating, The Hidden Half of Nature, The Death of Cancer, and The Secret of Our Success

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image: Microbesity

Microbesity

By | November 1, 2015

Obesity appears linked to the gut microbiome. How and why is still a mystery—but scientists have plenty of ideas.

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | November 1, 2015

November 2015's selection of notable quotes

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image: Rewarding Companions

Rewarding Companions

By | October 26, 2015

Oxytocin and social contact together modulate endocannabinoid activity in the mouse brain, which could help explain the prosocial effects of marijuana use. 

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image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | October 22, 2015

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

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image: Microbiome Meals

Microbiome Meals

By | October 1, 2015

Researchers identify a handful of genes that help bacteria in the mouse gut adapt to dietary changes.

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