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A new literature review finds that even if babies born via Cesarean section have long-term health risks, as a number of past studies purport, it may not be a result of the procedure itself.

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Obesity-associated microbiome composition can persist after weight loss, affecting the exchange of metabolites between a mouse and its resident bugs, researchers report.

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image: Bacteria Show Signs of Starvation in Space

Bacteria Show Signs of Starvation in Space

By | November 18, 2016

E. coli cultured on the International Space Station show increased expression of genes related to starvation and acid-resistance responses, researchers report.

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In his latest book, the famed primatologist replaces one dogma with another.

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image: Companionship May Help Chimps Chill Out

Companionship May Help Chimps Chill Out

By | November 2, 2016

Study suggests chimpanzees get by with a little help from their primate pals.

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image: Antarctic Bacteria Latch Onto Ice with Molecular Fishing Rod

Antarctic Bacteria Latch Onto Ice with Molecular Fishing Rod

By | November 1, 2016

Researchers describe the first known bacterial adhesion molecule that binds to frozen water. 

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image: Assessing the Behavior of Lab Animals

Assessing the Behavior of Lab Animals

By | November 1, 2016

Advances in cage design and monitoring software allow the collection of more realistic data.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | November 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the November 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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Male mice exposed to females, their urine, or a chemical in their urine lost sensory neurons in their vomeronasal organs that respond to that chemical.

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image: Sealing the Deal

Sealing the Deal

By | November 1, 2016

Irish researchers convert seals into remote oceanographic sensors by attaching tags containing temperature probes and other technologies to their heads.

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