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image: Three Monkey Brains, One Robotic Arm

Three Monkey Brains, One Robotic Arm

By | July 10, 2015

Researchers network the brains of three monkeys to create a “living computer” that can steer an image of a robotic arm toward a target.

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image: Gene Therapy Fixes Mouse Hearing

Gene Therapy Fixes Mouse Hearing

By | July 9, 2015

Expressing a gene for a component of the inner ear’s hair cells treated a form of genetic deafness.

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image: Can We Smell A Trillion Odors?

Can We Smell A Trillion Odors?

By | July 8, 2015

A reanalysis calls into question a year-old claim that humans can decipher at least 1 trillion different scents.

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image: Evolution of Kin Discrimination

Evolution of Kin Discrimination

By | July 6, 2015

A bacterium’s ability to distinguish self from non-self can arise spontaneously, a study shows, reigniting questions of whether the trait can be considered an adaptation.

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image: Self-fertilizing Worms Stab Their Own Heads

Self-fertilizing Worms Stab Their Own Heads

By | July 1, 2015

The flatworm, Macrostomum hystrix can inject its own sperm into its head, a new study shows.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | July 1, 2015

Stoned, Anxious, The Deeper Genome, and Testosterone

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image: Gutless Worm

Gutless Worm

By | July 1, 2015

Meet the digestive tract–lacking oligochaete that has fueled Max Planck researcher Nicole Dubilier’s interest in symbiosis and marine science.

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image: Sold on Symbiosis

Sold on Symbiosis

By | July 1, 2015

A love of the ocean lured Nicole Dubilier into science; gutless sea worms and their nurturing bacterial symbionts keep her at the leading edge of marine microbiology.

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | July 1, 2015

July 2015's selection of notable quotes

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image: Sponging Up Phosphorus

Sponging Up Phosphorus

By | July 1, 2015

Symbiotic bacteria in Caribbean reef sponges store polyphosphate granules, possibly explaining why phosphorous is so scarce in coral reef ecosystems.

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