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image: Gut Bugs Affect Cockroach Poop-ularity

Gut Bugs Affect Cockroach Poop-ularity

By | December 9, 2015

Commensal bacteria living in the gastrointestinal tracts of cockroaches lace the insects’ feces with chemical cues that mediate social behavior, according to a study.

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image: Owl Be Darned

Owl Be Darned

By | December 4, 2015

Researchers studying city-dwelling birds are learning about which animals are more suited to urban life.

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image: Urban Owl-Fitters

Urban Owl-Fitters

By | December 1, 2015

How birds with an innate propensity for living among humans are establishing populations in cities

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image: Ebola’s Effects on the Eye

Ebola’s Effects on the Eye

By | November 30, 2015

A second doctor shows symptoms of ocular disease after recovering from Ebola infection.

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image: Channeling Animals

Channeling Animals

By | November 25, 2015

Artists reinterpret structures built by birds, insects, and corals in a new exhibit.

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image: Supergene Explains Ruff Mating

Supergene Explains Ruff Mating

By | November 18, 2015

Two sequencing studies reveal the genetics underlying the sexual behavior of the European and Asian birds.

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image: Birth of the Skin Microbiome

Birth of the Skin Microbiome

By | November 17, 2015

The immune system tolerates the colonization of commensal bacteria on the skin with the aid of regulatory T cells during the first few weeks of life, a mouse study shows.

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image: Stressed Shore Crabs

Stressed Shore Crabs

By | November 12, 2015

Electrical shocks cause a physiological stress response in invertebrates previously thought incapable of feeling pain.

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image: Microbes Play Role in Anti-Tumor Response

Microbes Play Role in Anti-Tumor Response

By | November 5, 2015

Gut microbiome composition can influence the effectiveness of cancer immunotherapy in mice.

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image: Ebola’s Immune Escape

Ebola’s Immune Escape

By | November 3, 2015

The virus can persist in several tissues where the immune system is less active. Researchers are working to better understand this phenomenon and how it can stall the clearing of Ebola in survivors.

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