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image: Is Anatomy Destiny?

Is Anatomy Destiny?

By | March 1, 2015

Alice Dreger, historian of science and author of this month's "Reading Frames," explores the blurry lines between male and female in her 2010 TED talk.

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | March 1, 2015

March 2015's selection of notable quotes

3 Comments

image: Stirring the Pot

Stirring the Pot

By | March 1, 2015

How to navigate the slings and arrows of conducting “controversial” research

4 Comments

image: Indian Grad Students on Strike

Indian Grad Students on Strike

By | February 25, 2015

With a promised pay hike delayed, thousands of Indian PhD students launch protests in New Delhi.

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image: Canine Facial Recognition

Canine Facial Recognition

By | February 13, 2015

Dogs can distinguish between angry and happy human faces, a study finds.

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image: Aping Language

Aping Language

By | February 6, 2015

Chimpanzees can learn “words” for objects, a study suggests.

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image: Roach Conformity

Roach Conformity

By | February 4, 2015

Individual cockroaches can be shy or bold, but they alter their behavior to fit in with a group, a study shows.

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image: Taking Turns

Taking Turns

By | February 3, 2015

Using GPS trackers, researchers demonstrate an energy-saving flight strategy for migratory birds.

2 Comments

image: Book Excerpt from <em>Women After All</em>

Book Excerpt from Women After All

By | February 2, 2015

In the introduction to his latest book, author Melvin Konner explains why he considers maleness a departure from normal physiology.

6 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | February 1, 2015

Touch, The Altruistic Brain, Is Shame Necessary?, and Future Arctic

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