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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Redesigning Life</em>

Book Excerpt from Redesigning Life

By | December 1, 2016

In Chapter 8, author John Parrington explores the intersection of precision genome editing and stem cell technologies.

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | December 1, 2016

The importance of science innovation, publishing and gender, and more

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image: Slideshow: Nerdy Birdies

Slideshow: Nerdy Birdies

By | December 1, 2016

Meet the pigeons that are redefining what it means to behave like a human by displaying remarkable pattern recognition abilities.

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image: 2016 Top 10 Innovations: Honorable Mentions

2016 Top 10 Innovations: Honorable Mentions

By | December 1, 2016

These runners up to the Top 10 Innovations of 2016 caught our judges' attention.

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image: Opinion: The Impact Factor, Re-envisioned

Opinion: The Impact Factor, Re-envisioned

By , , and | November 18, 2016

A combination of the traditional metric and the newer h5 index potentiates the scientific community toward more-balanced evaluation. 

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In his latest book, the famed primatologist replaces one dogma with another.

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image: Companionship May Help Chimps Chill Out

Companionship May Help Chimps Chill Out

By | November 2, 2016

Study suggests chimpanzees get by with a little help from their primate pals.

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image: 2016 Life Sciences Salary Survey

2016 Life Sciences Salary Survey

By | November 1, 2016

Most researchers feel stimulated by their work but are dissatisfied with their compensation, according to this year’s results.

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image: Assessing the Behavior of Lab Animals

Assessing the Behavior of Lab Animals

By | November 1, 2016

Advances in cage design and monitoring software allow the collection of more realistic data.

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Male mice exposed to females, their urine, or a chemical in their urine lost sensory neurons in their vomeronasal organs that respond to that chemical.

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