The Scientist

» animal behavior and culture

Most Recent

image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | September 1, 2015

September 2015's selection of notable quotes

1 Comment

image: Study: Short Headlines Get More Citations

Study: Short Headlines Get More Citations

By | August 27, 2015

Scientific journals that publish papers with snappier titles accrue more citations per paper, according to a report.

0 Comments

image: Opinion: Making Progress by Slowing Down

Opinion: Making Progress by Slowing Down

By | August 24, 2015

Academic research could be strengthened by thinking more and doing less.

5 Comments

image: Pupil Alignment of Predators and Prey

Pupil Alignment of Predators and Prey

By | August 11, 2015

Ambush predators are more likely to have vertical slit pupils, while foraging animals tend to have horizontal ones, a study shows.

3 Comments

image: Book Excerpt from <em>Life on the Edge</em>

Book Excerpt from Life on the Edge

By | August 1, 2015

In Chapter 4, “The quantum beat,” authors Johnjoe McFadden and Jim Al-Khalili rethink Newton’s apple from a quantum-biological perspective.

0 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | August 1, 2015

Gods of the Morning, Hedonic Eating, A Beautiful Question, and Genomic Messages

0 Comments

image: Good Vibrations

Good Vibrations

By | August 1, 2015

Does a delicately orchestrated balance between quantum and classical physics distinguish living from nonliving things?

15 Comments

image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | July 27, 2015

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

0 Comments

image: Mammal–Carnivorous Plant Mutualism

Mammal–Carnivorous Plant Mutualism

By | July 13, 2015

A pitcher plant species in Borneo attracts bat inhabitants by reflecting sonar signals from the flying mammals, advertising a cozy roost, and getting nitrogen-rich guano in return.

2 Comments

image: Self-fertilizing Worms Stab Their Own Heads

Self-fertilizing Worms Stab Their Own Heads

By | July 1, 2015

The flatworm, Macrostomum hystrix can inject its own sperm into its head, a new study shows.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Exercise Boosts Telomere Transcription
  2. Classic Example of Symbiosis Revised
  3. The Genetic Components of Rare Diseases
  4. Orangutan Imitates Human Speech
RayBiotech