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image: Scientists Activate Predatory Instinct in Mice

Scientists Activate Predatory Instinct in Mice

By | January 16, 2017

A new study reveals how the amygdala is involved in controlling predatory behavior in mice.

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image: How Mammalian Moms and Babies Choose Sides

How Mammalian Moms and Babies Choose Sides

By | January 11, 2017

A survey of 11 species confirms that mothers prefer to keep their offspring to one side of their bodies, but that their offspring tend to approach them from the opposite side.

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Children born to obese parents are at increased risk of failing motor development and cognitive tests, according to an NIH-led study.

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image: Eel-ucidating A Fishy Mystery

Eel-ucidating A Fishy Mystery

By | January 1, 2017

Researchers are using high-tech solutions to bring the lifecycle of the European eel into sharper focus.

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image: Researchers Track Eels on Their Cross-Atlantic Migration

Researchers Track Eels on Their Cross-Atlantic Migration

By | January 1, 2017

A mysterious migration is coming to light after more than a century of study.

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image: Famed Mammalian Embryologist Dies

Famed Mammalian Embryologist Dies

By | December 2, 2016

Andrzej Tarkowski’s research laid the groundwork for future advances in cloning, stem cell research, and in vitro fertilization.

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Scientists are enlisting the help of pigeons, parrots, crows, jays, and other species to disprove the notion that human cognitive abilities are beyond those of other animals.

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image: How to Track Cell Lineages As They Develop

How to Track Cell Lineages As They Develop

By | December 1, 2016

Sequencing and gene-editing advances make tracing a cells journey throughout development easier than ever.

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image: Slideshow: Nerdy Birdies

Slideshow: Nerdy Birdies

By | December 1, 2016

Meet the pigeons that are redefining what it means to behave like a human by displaying remarkable pattern recognition abilities.

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In his latest book, the famed primatologist replaces one dogma with another.

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