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image: Sleepy Squirrels

Sleepy Squirrels

By | January 1, 2016

Visit the lab of Matthew Andrews at the University of Minnesota Duluth, who studies hibernating thirteen-lined ground squirrels to learn how their hearts manage extreme temperature fluctuations.

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image: Maintaining Cooperation

Maintaining Cooperation

By | January 1, 2016

How organisms keep their biological partners from cheating

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image: Gut Bugs Affect Cockroach Poop-ularity

Gut Bugs Affect Cockroach Poop-ularity

By | December 9, 2015

Commensal bacteria living in the gastrointestinal tracts of cockroaches lace the insects’ feces with chemical cues that mediate social behavior, according to a study.

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image: Owl Be Darned

Owl Be Darned

By | December 4, 2015

Researchers studying city-dwelling birds are learning about which animals are more suited to urban life.

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image: The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

By | December 1, 2015

A rash of deformed lambs eventually led to the creation of a cancer-fighting agent.

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image: Urban Owl-Fitters

Urban Owl-Fitters

By | December 1, 2015

How birds with an innate propensity for living among humans are establishing populations in cities

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image: Channeling Animals

Channeling Animals

By | November 25, 2015

Artists reinterpret structures built by birds, insects, and corals in a new exhibit.

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image: Supergene Explains Ruff Mating

Supergene Explains Ruff Mating

By | November 18, 2015

Two sequencing studies reveal the genetics underlying the sexual behavior of the European and Asian birds.

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image: Stressed Shore Crabs

Stressed Shore Crabs

By | November 12, 2015

Electrical shocks cause a physiological stress response in invertebrates previously thought incapable of feeling pain.

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image: Blood Cell Development Reimagined

Blood Cell Development Reimagined

By | November 9, 2015

A new study is rewriting 50 years of biological dogma by suggesting that mature blood cells develop much more rapidly from stem cells than previously thought.

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