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» animal behavior and developmental biology

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image: Send in the Bots

Send in the Bots

By | October 1, 2013

Animal robots have become a unique tool for studying the behavior of their flesh-and-blood counterparts.

1 Comment

image: The Ultimate Game of Cat and Mouse

The Ultimate Game of Cat and Mouse

By | September 18, 2013

Toxoplasma gondii seems to cause hard-wired changes in the brains of mice that persist even after the parasite is gone.

2 Comments

image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | September 12, 2013

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

0 Comments

image: Electric Fish Kin Wired Differently

Electric Fish Kin Wired Differently

By | August 29, 2013

Two new species of closely related electric fishes discovered in the Amazon produce very different electrical signals: one AC, the other DC.

1 Comment

image: Bacterial Quid Pro Quo

Bacterial Quid Pro Quo

By | August 19, 2013

Pseudomonas aeruginosa gather swarming speed at the expense of their ability to form biofilms in an experimental evolution setup.

0 Comments

image: Stem Cells Open Up Options

Stem Cells Open Up Options

By | August 13, 2013

Pluripotent cells can help regenerate tissues and maintain long life—and they may also help animals jumpstart drastically new lifestyles.

17 Comments

image: A Sense of Mystery

A Sense of Mystery

By | August 1, 2013

Researchers from various disciplines are homing in on the mechanics of magnetoreception, an enigmatic sense that some animals use to navigate the globe.

8 Comments

image: Another Super Shrew

Another Super Shrew

By | July 24, 2013

A newly discovered sister species to the hero shrew shares its spine of steel, hinting at the evolution and function of the super-strong anatomical structure.

0 Comments

image: Group Think

Group Think

By | July 1, 2013

Flocks of birds and schools of fish become more than the sum of their parts thanks to complex interactive behaviors.

1 Comment

image: Crowd Control

Crowd Control

By | July 1, 2013

Molecules, cells, or vertebrates—when individuals move and act as a single unit, surprisingly complex behaviors arise that hint at the origins of multicellularity.

7 Comments

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