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The Scientist

» animal behavior and developmental biology

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image: The Love Bug

The Love Bug

By | July 1, 2014

A mysterious iridovirus outbreak in a lab colony of crickets reveals the virus’s ability to spur increased sexual activity.

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image: Sly Guys

Sly Guys

By | July 1, 2014

Across the animal kingdom, dominance isn’t the only way for a male to score. Colluding, sneaking around, or cross-dressing can work, too.

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image: Arrested Development Makes for Long-Lived Worms

Arrested Development Makes for Long-Lived Worms

By | June 23, 2014

Starvation suspends cellular activity in C. elegans larvae and extends their lifespan. 

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image: Autism-Hormone Link Found

Autism-Hormone Link Found

By | June 4, 2014

A study documents boys with autism who were exposed to elevated levels of testosterone, cortisol, and other hormones in utero.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Drunken Monkey</em>

Book Excerpt from The Drunken Monkey

By | June 1, 2014

In Chapter 3, "On the Inebriation of Elephants," author Robert Dudley considers whether tales of tipsy pachyderms and bombed baboons have any basis in scientific truth.

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image: How the Octopus Keeps Its Arms Straight

How the Octopus Keeps Its Arms Straight

By | May 15, 2014

Researchers uncover a self-recognition mechanism that prevents octopus limbs from becoming entangled, despite their powerful suction.

2 Comments

image: The Infanticidal-to-Paternal Switch

The Infanticidal-to-Paternal Switch

By | May 14, 2014

Researchers reveal a group of neurons in the mouse brain that mediate a male’s instincts to either eat or nurture pups.

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image: The Telltale Tail

The Telltale Tail

By | May 1, 2014

A symbiotic relationship between squid and bacteria provides an alternative explanation for bacterial sheathed flagella.

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image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | April 28, 2014

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

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image: Slashers of the Sea

Slashers of the Sea

By | April 24, 2014

With high-speed cameras, scientists find that sailfish use their bills to corral and slash other fish, like schooling sardines.

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