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» animal behavior and developmental biology

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image: Go Forth, Cells

Go Forth, Cells

By | February 1, 2013

Watch the cell transplant experiments in zebrafish that suggest certain embryonic cells rely on intrinsic directional cues for collective migration.

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image: Predator-Savvy Shark Embryos

Predator-Savvy Shark Embryos

By | January 10, 2013

Bamboo sharks still developing in their egg cases respond to a predator presence by ceasing movement and even breathing.

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image: Mums Tell Dads to Care

Mums Tell Dads to Care

By | January 8, 2013

Mouse mothers emit ultrasound vocalizations and odor cues to stimulate otherwise uninterested fathers to provide parental care to their pups.

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image: Spider Sculpts Fake Spider

Spider Sculpts Fake Spider

By | December 19, 2012

A putative new species of spider found in the Peruvian Amazon uses forest debris to weave sculptures that resemble a giant spider into its web.

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image: 2012 Multimedia Roundup

2012 Multimedia Roundup

By | December 14, 2012

The science images and videos that captured our attention in 2012

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image: Marlboro Chicks

Marlboro Chicks

By | December 5, 2012

Two species of songbirds pack their nests with scavenged cigarette butts that repel irksome parasites.

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image: Coughing Seashells

Coughing Seashells

By | November 28, 2012

A type of scallop expels water and waste through a sort of cough that could reveal clues about water quality.

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image: Embattled Ape Researcher Reinstated

Embattled Ape Researcher Reinstated

By | November 26, 2012

A controversial primate researcher is back at work after being cleared of endangering bonobos under her care, but critics are demanding an external enquiry.

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image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | November 7, 2012

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

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image: Dolled-Up Turtles

Dolled-Up Turtles

By | November 1, 2012

Borrowing techniques from nail and hair salons, researchers have devised a method to tag small, previously untrackable sea turtles.

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