The Scientist

» animal behavior, disease/medicine and culture

Most Recent

image: Immune to Failure

Immune to Failure

By | February 1, 2013

With dogged persistence and an unwillingness to entertain defeat, Bruce Beutler discovered a receptor that powers the innate immune response to infections—and earned his share of a Nobel Prize.

2 Comments

image: Let's Make a Deal

Let's Make a Deal

By | February 1, 2013

Six myths about job and salary negotiations and how they may hinder your ability to bargain effectively.

2 Comments

image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | February 1, 2013

February 2013's selection of notable quotes

2 Comments

image: The A@#hole Scientist

The A@#hole Scientist

By | February 1, 2013

Can a vexing sense of entitlement actually aid in the pursuit of knowledge?

15 Comments

image: Why Insects Should Be in Your Diet

Why Insects Should Be in Your Diet

By | February 1, 2013

Because of their high protein and fat content and their reproductive efficiency, insects hold great promise for thwarting an impending global food crisis.

15 Comments

image: Catching the Cold

Catching the Cold

By | February 1, 2013

Tracking the genetic diversity and evolution of rhinoviruses can lead to a better understanding of viral evolution, the common cold, and more dangerous infections.

2 Comments

image: Opinion: Communication Crisis in Research

Opinion: Communication Crisis in Research

By | January 30, 2013

The problem threatens progress and stems from both a lack of attention to clear discourse and a scientific culture not focused on critical challenges.

9 Comments

image: Opinion: An Explosion of Devices

Opinion: An Explosion of Devices

By | January 28, 2013

From cardiovascular problems to neurological disorders, a plethora of new medical devices are reducing the need for surgery and improving the quality and safety of healthcare.

0 Comments

image: Stem Cells Not Rejected

Stem Cells Not Rejected

By | January 25, 2013

Researchers uncover more evidence that reprogrammed stem cells are not attacked by the immune system, suggesting they may one day serve as effective therapies.

1 Comment

image: Non-coding Mutations May Drive Cancer

Non-coding Mutations May Drive Cancer

By | January 24, 2013

The majority of human melanomas contain mutations in a gene promoter, suggesting mutations in regulatory regions may spur some cancers.

3 Comments

Popular Now

  1. NYU Halts Studies, Suspends Investigator
    The Nutshell NYU Halts Studies, Suspends Investigator

    Experiments conducted at the New York University School of Medicine violated several research standards, according to US Food and Drug Administration investigators.

  2. Exercise-Induced Muscle Factor Promotes Memory
  3. The Meaning of Pupil Dilation
    Daily News The Meaning of Pupil Dilation

    Scientists are using pupil measurements to study a wide range of psychological processes and to get a glimpse into the mind.

  4. Brexit’s Effects on Science