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image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | January 16, 2014

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

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image: Fewer Female Snail Penises

Fewer Female Snail Penises

By | January 14, 2014

Researchers are now spotting fewer cases of imposex—in which female sea snails develop male sexual organs—as a result of a chemical ban instituted in 2008.

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image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | January 13, 2014

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

3 Comments

image: Large Carnivores Under Siege

Large Carnivores Under Siege

By | January 13, 2014

As populations of top predators decline in ecosystems the world over, researchers chart the widespread effects.

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image: Settlement Signal

Settlement Signal

By | January 9, 2014

A marine bacterium generates contractile structures that are essential for the metamorphosis of a tubeworm.

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image: Dung Beetles Navigate by Sunlight

Dung Beetles Navigate by Sunlight

By | January 7, 2014

Shortly after demonstrating dung beetles’ ability to navigate by the stars, researchers in Sweden provide evidence that the insects can also use the sun to find their way.

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image: Really Bad Breath

Really Bad Breath

By | January 3, 2014

Tobacco hornworms release puffs of nicotine that deter some predators.

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image: BBC Cameras Capture Dolphin High?

BBC Cameras Capture Dolphin High?

By | January 2, 2014

A new, two-part TV series to be aired on BBC1 includes video of dolphins playing with toxic puffer fish—possibly to get intoxicated.

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image: A Ribbeting Tale

A Ribbeting Tale

By | January 1, 2014

A famous frog-hopping contest yields data that challenge previous lab estimates of how far a bullfrog can jump.

1 Comment

image: Flapless Flight

Flapless Flight

By | January 1, 2014

New research increases the understanding of how albatrosses fly effortlessly by harvesting energy out of thin air.

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