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image: Opinion: The Impact Factor, Re-envisioned

Opinion: The Impact Factor, Re-envisioned

By , , and | November 18, 2016

A combination of the traditional metric and the newer h5 index potentiates the scientific community toward more-balanced evaluation. 

2 Comments

In his latest book, the famed primatologist replaces one dogma with another.

3 Comments

image: Companionship May Help Chimps Chill Out

Companionship May Help Chimps Chill Out

By | November 2, 2016

Study suggests chimpanzees get by with a little help from their primate pals.

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image: 2016 Life Sciences Salary Survey

2016 Life Sciences Salary Survey

By | November 1, 2016

Most researchers feel stimulated by their work but are dissatisfied with their compensation, according to this year’s results.

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image: Assessing the Behavior of Lab Animals

Assessing the Behavior of Lab Animals

By | November 1, 2016

Advances in cage design and monitoring software allow the collection of more realistic data.

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Male mice exposed to females, their urine, or a chemical in their urine lost sensory neurons in their vomeronasal organs that respond to that chemical.

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image: Sealing the Deal

Sealing the Deal

By | November 1, 2016

Irish researchers convert seals into remote oceanographic sensors by attaching tags containing temperature probes and other technologies to their heads.

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image: Social Media Accelerates Science

Social Media Accelerates Science

By | November 1, 2016

How researchers are taking advantage of Twitter and other forums to do, share, and discuss research

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image: Week in Review: October 24–28

Week in Review: October 24–28

By | October 27, 2016

Patient Zero exonerated; Jack Woodall dies; Wolbachia-harboring mosquitoes deployed in fight against Zika; implanted neurons function in adult mouse brain 

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image: Monkey Tools and Early Human Ingenuity

Monkey Tools and Early Human Ingenuity

By | October 25, 2016

Wild capuchin monkeys in Brazil produce sharp stone flakes by accident, causing some researchers to suggest a rethink of the beginnings of human tool use.

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