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image: Defending Against Plagiarism

Defending Against Plagiarism

By | June 1, 2013

Publishers need to be proactive about detecting and deterring copied text.

5 Comments

image: Making Good on Research

Making Good on Research

By | June 1, 2013

Scientists working in developing nations who engage in capacity building find it bolsters the lives of locals and their own work.

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image: Mary O’Connor: Warming Up

Mary O’Connor: Warming Up

By | June 1, 2013

Assistant Professor, Department of Zoology, University of British Columbia. Age: 34

1 Comment

image: Misconduct Around the Globe

Misconduct Around the Globe

By | June 1, 2013

Research misconduct is not limited to the developed world, but few countries anywhere are responding adequately.

3 Comments

image: Salamander Evolution

Salamander Evolution

By | June 1, 2013

Yale University evolutionary biologist Steven Brady studies the evolutionary impacts of roads on the amphibians.

2 Comments

image: Best Places to Work Industry 2013

Best Places to Work Industry 2013

By | June 1, 2013

Our final survey of the life-science industry workplace highlights the companies—small and large, domestic and international—that are making their researchers feel valued and at home.

2 Comments

image: It Takes a Village

It Takes a Village

By | June 1, 2013

Scientists working in developing countries find that giving back to local communities enriches their own research.

3 Comments

image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | May 23, 2013

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

1 Comment

image: Arctic Bacteria Thrives at Mars Temps

Arctic Bacteria Thrives at Mars Temps

By | May 23, 2013

Researchers discover a microbe living at -15°C, the coldest temperature ever reported for bacterial growth, giving hope to the search for life elsewhere in the cosmos.

0 Comments

image: Malarial Mosquitos Drawn to Human Smell

Malarial Mosquitos Drawn to Human Smell

By | May 17, 2013

Mosquitos infected by the malaria parasite are more likely to land on and probe a substrate laced with human body odor than their uninfected counterparts.

1 Comment

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