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image: Aping Language

Aping Language

By | February 6, 2015

Chimpanzees can learn “words” for objects, a study suggests.

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image: Roach Conformity

Roach Conformity

By | February 4, 2015

Individual cockroaches can be shy or bold, but they alter their behavior to fit in with a group, a study shows.

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image: Taking Turns

Taking Turns

By | February 3, 2015

Using GPS trackers, researchers demonstrate an energy-saving flight strategy for migratory birds.

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image: Panic of the Disco Clam

Panic of the Disco Clam

By | January 6, 2015

The mollusk’s flashy tactics scare off predators.

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image: Taming Bushmeat

Taming Bushmeat

By | January 1, 2015

Chinese farmers’ efforts at rearing wild animals may benefit conservation and reduce human health risks.

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image: The Genetics of Society

The Genetics of Society

By | January 1, 2015

Researchers aim to unravel the molecular mechanisms by which a single genotype gives rise to diverse castes in eusocial organisms.

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image: Bats Make a Comeback

Bats Make a Comeback

By | December 22, 2014

Citizen-scientist data obtained through the U.K.’s National Bat Monitoring Programme show that populations of 10 bat species have stabilized or are growing.

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image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | December 18, 2014

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

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image: Bat Navigation Revealed

Bat Navigation Revealed

By | December 4, 2014

As the flying mammals navigate complex environments, they make use of specialized brain cells that cooperate to build a coordinate system that works in three dimensions.

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image: How Dogs Interpret Speech

How Dogs Interpret Speech

By | December 2, 2014

Dogs tend to turn to the left when they hear emotional speech-like sounds, and right when they hear verbal commands from a robot.

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