The Scientist

» animal behavior and ecology

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image: Review: Gossamer Gallants

Review: Gossamer Gallants

By | April 5, 2013

The insect-inspired dance by choreographer Paul Taylor strikes the perfect balance between six-legged realism and artistic fancy.


image: An Ear for Home

An Ear for Home

By | April 1, 2013

Pigeons may use ultra-low-frequency sounds to navigate—a strategy that could steer them off course in the face of infrasonic disturbances, such as sonic booms.


image: Speed-Sensitive Denticles

Speed-Sensitive Denticles

By | April 1, 2013

Tooth-like structures on the skin of a South American fish might serve as high-velocity water-flow detectors.


image: Bridges for UK Water Voles

Bridges for UK Water Voles

By | March 20, 2013

Newly constructed ramps will expand the habitat available to a colony of water voles in London, and similar ramps elsewhere could encourage isolated populations to mix.   


image: Native Frogs Beat Invasive Toads

Native Frogs Beat Invasive Toads

By | March 8, 2013

Native Australian frog tadpoles outcompete the tadpoles of the invasive cane toad, suggesting the native frogs could form part of a suburban control program.


image: Drugged Fish Act Different

Drugged Fish Act Different

By | February 14, 2013

A psychiatric drug in the water can cause perch to be less social, more voracious hunters.


image: Icy Algae in a Changing Arctic

Icy Algae in a Changing Arctic

By | February 14, 2013

New research adds to an emerging picture of the changes that global warming and thinning ice are wreaking on the marine ecosystems at the top of the world.


image: Sampling the New Arctic

Sampling the New Arctic

By | February 14, 2013

Scenes from a research trip, where researchers peered beneath the ice to shine a light on the emerging picture of a changing Arctic Ocean


image: The Detachable Penis

The Detachable Penis

By | February 14, 2013

A species of sea slug discards its penis after mating, then grows another the next day, a tactic that may have evolved to avoid passing on the sperm of competitors.  


image: Diversity Defeats Disease

Diversity Defeats Disease

By | February 13, 2013

In a pond, more amphibian species mean decreased chances of disease spread.


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