The Scientist

» animal behavior and ecology

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image: Electric Fish Kin Wired Differently

Electric Fish Kin Wired Differently

By | August 29, 2013

Two new species of closely related electric fishes discovered in the Amazon produce very different electrical signals: one AC, the other DC.

1 Comment

image: A Sense of Mystery

A Sense of Mystery

By | August 1, 2013

Researchers from various disciplines are homing in on the mechanics of magnetoreception, an enigmatic sense that some animals use to navigate the globe.

8 Comments

image: Another Super Shrew

Another Super Shrew

By | July 24, 2013

A newly discovered sister species to the hero shrew shares its spine of steel, hinting at the evolution and function of the super-strong anatomical structure.

0 Comments

image: Dolphins by Name

Dolphins by Name

By | July 23, 2013

Bottlenose dolphins can recognize and respond to their own “signature whistles,” strengthening the evidence that these whistles function like names.

2 Comments

image: Group Think

Group Think

By | July 1, 2013

Flocks of birds and schools of fish become more than the sum of their parts thanks to complex interactive behaviors.

1 Comment

image: Research Behind Bars

Research Behind Bars

By | July 1, 2013

Ecologist Nalini Nadkarni advances forest conservation and science advocacy by enlisting the help of prisoners.

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image: Science on Lockdown

Science on Lockdown

By | July 1, 2013

A forest ecologist comes down from the canopy to bring science to the masses, forming a series of improbable collaborations with prisoners.

3 Comments

image: Sea Bugs

Sea Bugs

By | July 1, 2013

Ocean viruses can impact marine ecosystems in several ways.

0 Comments

image: An Ocean of Viruses

An Ocean of Viruses

By | July 1, 2013

Viruses abound in the world’s oceans, yet researchers are only beginning to understand how they affect life and chemistry from the water’s surface to the sea floor.

3 Comments

image: Crowd Control

Crowd Control

By | July 1, 2013

Molecules, cells, or vertebrates—when individuals move and act as a single unit, surprisingly complex behaviors arise that hint at the origins of multicellularity.

7 Comments

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