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image: Emperor Penguins on Thin Ice

Emperor Penguins on Thin Ice

By | June 30, 2014

A new model suggests emperor penguin populations could decline by 19 percent by 2100.

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image: Mosquitoes Attracted to Malaria-Infected Mice

Mosquitoes Attracted to Malaria-Infected Mice

By | June 30, 2014

Mice infected with a malaria-causing parasite emit odors that are more attractive to malaria-transmitting mosquitoes than uninfected animals, a study shows.

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image: Combating Asian Carp

Combating Asian Carp

By | June 5, 2014

A new plan to protect the Great Lakes from the invasive species is set in motion.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Drunken Monkey</em>

Book Excerpt from The Drunken Monkey

By | June 1, 2014

In Chapter 3, "On the Inebriation of Elephants," author Robert Dudley considers whether tales of tipsy pachyderms and bombed baboons have any basis in scientific truth.

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image: Wild Relatives

Wild Relatives

By , , and | June 1, 2014

As rich sources of genetic diversity, the progenitors and kin of today’s food crops hold great promise for improving production in agriculture’s challenging future.

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image: Running Wild

Running Wild

By | May 22, 2014

Mice in nature appear to enjoy running on wheels, helping to settle the question whether the behavior is a just a neurotic response in lab mice.

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image: How the Octopus Keeps Its Arms Straight

How the Octopus Keeps Its Arms Straight

By | May 15, 2014

Researchers uncover a self-recognition mechanism that prevents octopus limbs from becoming entangled, despite their powerful suction.

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image: The Infanticidal-to-Paternal Switch

The Infanticidal-to-Paternal Switch

By | May 14, 2014

Researchers reveal a group of neurons in the mouse brain that mediate a male’s instincts to either eat or nurture pups.

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image: Rock Snot Explained

Rock Snot Explained

By | May 8, 2014

An increasingly common algal growth, found in rivers the world over, is caused by changing environmental conditions, not accidental introductions.

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image: Finch-Powered Fumigation

Finch-Powered Fumigation

By | May 7, 2014

Darwin’s finches use pesticide-treated cotton to line their nests and unwittingly protect themselves against parasitic fly larvae.

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