The Scientist

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image: How Plants Evolved to Eat Meat

How Plants Evolved to Eat Meat

By | February 7, 2017

Pitcher plants across different continents acquired their tastes for meat in similar ways.

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image: Cannibalism: Not That Weird

Cannibalism: Not That Weird

By | February 1, 2017

Eating members of your own species might turn the stomach of the average human, but some animal species make a habit of dining on their own.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | February 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the February 2017 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Earliest Deuterostome Fossils Described

Earliest Deuterostome Fossils Described

By | January 31, 2017

These millimeter-size sea creatures lived 540 million years ago.

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image: Study: One Wasp Takes Control of Another

Study: One Wasp Takes Control of Another

By | January 25, 2017

Crypt keeper wasps appear to command crypt gall wasps to dig exit tunnels on their behalf.

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Using simulations, scientists report that a mixture of termites and plant competition may be responsible for the strange patterns of earth surrounded by plants in the Namib desert. 

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image: How Traffic Noise Affects Tree Frogs

How Traffic Noise Affects Tree Frogs

By | January 18, 2017

Constant exposure to the sounds of a busy road can impact a male European tree frog’s stress levels, immune system, and vocal sac coloration, scientists show.

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image: Scientists Activate Predatory Instinct in Mice

Scientists Activate Predatory Instinct in Mice

By | January 16, 2017

A new study reveals how the amygdala is involved in controlling predatory behavior in mice.

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image: Baboons Can Make Sounds Found in Human Speech

Baboons Can Make Sounds Found in Human Speech

By | January 13, 2017

The findings suggest language may have started to evolve millions of years earlier than once thought.  

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image: How Mammalian Moms and Babies Choose Sides

How Mammalian Moms and Babies Choose Sides

By | January 11, 2017

A survey of 11 species confirms that mothers prefer to keep their offspring to one side of their bodies, but that their offspring tend to approach them from the opposite side.

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