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Using simulations, scientists report that a mixture of termites and plant competition may be responsible for the strange patterns of earth surrounded by plants in the Namib desert. 

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image: How Traffic Noise Affects Tree Frogs

How Traffic Noise Affects Tree Frogs

By | January 18, 2017

Constant exposure to the sounds of a busy road can impact a male European tree frog’s stress levels, immune system, and vocal sac coloration, scientists show.

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image: Scientists Activate Predatory Instinct in Mice

Scientists Activate Predatory Instinct in Mice

By | January 16, 2017

A new study reveals how the amygdala is involved in controlling predatory behavior in mice.

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image: Baboons Can Make Sounds Found in Human Speech

Baboons Can Make Sounds Found in Human Speech

By | January 13, 2017

The findings suggest language may have started to evolve millions of years earlier than once thought.  

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image: How Mammalian Moms and Babies Choose Sides

How Mammalian Moms and Babies Choose Sides

By | January 11, 2017

A survey of 11 species confirms that mothers prefer to keep their offspring to one side of their bodies, but that their offspring tend to approach them from the opposite side.

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image: Adaptation, Island Style

Adaptation, Island Style

By | January 3, 2017

Anole lizards inhabiting the Caribbean islands display some of the key principles of evolution.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Testosterone Rex</em>

Book Excerpt from Testosterone Rex

By | January 1, 2017

In Chapter 6, “The Hormonal Essence of the T-Rex?” author Cordelia Fine considers the biological dogma that testes, and the powerful hormones they exude, are the root of all sexual inequality.

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The small lizards adapted to unique niches among dozens of isles.

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image: Eel-ucidating A Fishy Mystery

Eel-ucidating A Fishy Mystery

By | January 1, 2017

Researchers are using high-tech solutions to bring the lifecycle of the European eel into sharper focus.

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image: How an Invasive Bee Managed to Thrive in Australia

How an Invasive Bee Managed to Thrive in Australia

By | January 1, 2017

The Asian honeybee should have been crippled by low genetic diversity, but thanks to natural selection it thrived.

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