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image: To Each Animal Its Own Cognition

To Each Animal Its Own Cognition

By | May 1, 2016

The study of nonhuman intelligence is coming into its own as researchers realize the unique contexts in which distinct species learn and behave.

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image: Dragonfly is World-Record Flier

Dragonfly is World-Record Flier

By | March 3, 2016

Researchers have determined that a diminutive insect out-flies all other winged migrators by traveling thousands of miles between continents and across oceans yearly.

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image: Night Night, Flipper

Night Night, Flipper

By | March 1, 2016

Watch underwater footage of a dolphin sleeping in the wild.

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image: Water Bed

Water Bed

By | March 1, 2016

See zebrafish engage in sleeplike behavior.

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image: Opinion: On Animal Emotions

Opinion: On Animal Emotions

By | February 16, 2016

Even if animals do have emotions, anthropomorphism and language impede our understanding of their experiences.

9 Comments

image: Lizard Secretes Heat

Lizard Secretes Heat

By | January 25, 2016

Researchers confirm the unprecedented endothermic abilities of a South American reptile.

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image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | January 4, 2016

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

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image: Epigenetic Alterations Determine Ant Behavior

Epigenetic Alterations Determine Ant Behavior

By | January 4, 2016

Histone modifications to the DNA of Florida carpenter ants can turn soldiers into foragers.

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image: Inventing Teamwork

Inventing Teamwork

By | January 1, 2016

What can social networks among hunter-gatherers in Tanzania teach us about how cooperation evolved in human populations?

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image: Sleepy Squirrels

Sleepy Squirrels

By | January 1, 2016

Visit the lab of Matthew Andrews at the University of Minnesota Duluth, who studies hibernating thirteen-lined ground squirrels to learn how their hearts manage extreme temperature fluctuations.

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