The Scientist

» animal behavior

Most Recent

image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | January 4, 2016

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

0 Comments

image: Epigenetic Alterations Determine Ant Behavior

Epigenetic Alterations Determine Ant Behavior

By | January 4, 2016

Histone modifications to the DNA of Florida carpenter ants can turn soldiers into foragers.

1 Comment

image: Inventing Teamwork

Inventing Teamwork

By | January 1, 2016

What can social networks among hunter-gatherers in Tanzania teach us about how cooperation evolved in human populations?

0 Comments

image: Sleepy Squirrels

Sleepy Squirrels

By | January 1, 2016

Visit the lab of Matthew Andrews at the University of Minnesota Duluth, who studies hibernating thirteen-lined ground squirrels to learn how their hearts manage extreme temperature fluctuations.

0 Comments

image: Maintaining Cooperation

Maintaining Cooperation

By | January 1, 2016

How organisms keep their biological partners from cheating

0 Comments

image: Gut Bugs Affect Cockroach Poop-ularity

Gut Bugs Affect Cockroach Poop-ularity

By | December 9, 2015

Commensal bacteria living in the gastrointestinal tracts of cockroaches lace the insects’ feces with chemical cues that mediate social behavior, according to a study.

1 Comment

image: Owl Be Darned

Owl Be Darned

By | December 4, 2015

Researchers studying city-dwelling birds are learning about which animals are more suited to urban life.

1 Comment

image: Urban Owl-Fitters

Urban Owl-Fitters

By | December 1, 2015

How birds with an innate propensity for living among humans are establishing populations in cities

0 Comments

image: Channeling Animals

Channeling Animals

By | November 25, 2015

Artists reinterpret structures built by birds, insects, and corals in a new exhibit.

0 Comments

image: Supergene Explains Ruff Mating

Supergene Explains Ruff Mating

By | November 18, 2015

Two sequencing studies reveal the genetics underlying the sexual behavior of the European and Asian birds.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Running on Empty
    Features Running on Empty

    Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

  2. Authors Peeved by APA’s Article Takedown Pilot
  3. Athletes’ Microbiomes Differ from Nonathletes
  4. Was a Drop in CRISPR Firms’ Stock Warranted?
AAAS